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Friday, April 21, 2006

The Physics of Sound/Music

NPR's Science Friday is doing a great show on the physics of sound and music right now:

Examining the Physics of Music

Take a few select notes, add an envelope, some overtones, and just the right timbre. Now let that vibrate your basilar membrane. What do you have? Beethoven's Ninth, of course. So what makes one sound "musical" while another is just noise?

Guests:

Bryant Hichwa, professor, physics and astronomy, Sonoma State University

David Kirkby, associate professor, experimental particle physics, University of California Irvine

Brian Holmes, professor of physics, San Jose State University

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