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Monday, August 21, 2006

Music from the Stars, Literally

Now downloadable: music of the stars

Ancient Greeks thought planets and stars were embedded in vast crystal spheres that hummed as they spun around the heavens, giving off what the ancients called the music of the spheres.

It was a beautiful idea, and wrong.

But not totally wrong. There are no crystal spheres; but as astronomers found out in the 1970s, the sun and other stars do actually sing, said astronomer Donald Kurtz of The University of Central Lancashire in Preston, U.K.

The eerie tones are now downloadable

(via digg)

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